Divorce Remains High for Parents of Children with Autism After Age 8


Marsha Malick, Phd is the respected Director of the Waisman Center in Madison, WI and has pubished a study about “Mothers of children with autism have stress levels similar to combat soldiers“.  Now, the Waisman Center has worked hard to further study the effect on Autism and Divorce, despite Dr. Brian Freedman from Kennedy Kreiger Institute and his attempted debunking this myth. Although the glass-half-full result shows that 75% of the marriages stay intact, it’s worthy to explore one crucial factor in depth.

The new study is titled Autism’s Heavy Toll on Marriages and was published on 08/03/2010.

The study revealed that the divorce rate for parents of children with autism mirrors the divorce rate of the parents of children without disabilities until the child reaches 8 years of age. After that, the divorce rate goes down for parents of children without disabilities but remains high for parents of children with autism.  Parents of children with autism often continue to live with and experience high parenting demands into their child’s adulthood, and thus marital strain may remain high in these later years.”

Media Inquiries

Sigan Hartley hartley@waisman.wisc.edu
Marsha Mailick Seltzer mseltzer@waisman.wisc.edu
Email: hartley@waisman.wisc.edu
Office phone: (608) 262-8860

Advertisements

About autism custody battles

My Blog https://autismcustodybattles.wordpress.com
This entry was posted in Autism Custody Battles in the Media. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Divorce Remains High for Parents of Children with Autism After Age 8

  1. Amy says:

    thank you for validating stress that fosters emotions making me feel like a big ball of self-pity, confusion, and the scary D word that hovers like a black cloud over my consciousness. it wears you down, this thing we live with, and our son is 8 going on 9. thank you for making me understand that i am not alone…

  2. Maddy says:

    Pity the study doesn’t reveal more specifics e.g. maybe it’s the financial pressure since the vast majority of therapy isn’t covered by medical insurance.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s